The Churches of Polis Chrysochous

The nearby town of Polis Chrysochous, with its central square and pedestrian zone, makes for a pleasant stroll among old stone buildings.

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The nearby town of Polis Chrysochous, with its central square and pedestrian zone, makes for a pleasant stroll among old stone buildings. One way to judge the history of the town is to take a look at its churches. In the central square is the charming Greek Orthodox chapel dedicated to Saint Nicholas. It is regularly open for prayer and candle lighting. Although the chapel looks very old, a carving in the stone façade dates it to 1905. The oldest church in Polis is located on the western perimeter of the pedestrian area in a small park. The church of Saint Andronicus is thought to have been built in the sixteenth century, when the Venetians controlled the island; recently uncovered interior frescoes confirm this provenance. The original church building has a barrel vault and one nave; in the Ottoman era, the structure was converted to a mosque and expanded on the northern side. Walk a few buildings north, past the Art Café, and you will find the holy temple of Saint Kyriaki. The building has an arched roof and a single aisle. Currently undergoing renovation, the church dates to 1740. Of course, the Greek Orthodox church plays an important role in contemporary town life. Head east from the pedestrian zone to the traffic circle and you will see the Apostle Andreas Orthodox Church. Built in 2003 in the Byzantine style, the church hosts weddings, christenings, and funerals, offers regular worship services, and sits at the centre of the town’s religious festivals.